Category Archives: Automic

Quickfind my Automic blog posts

The “Next Big Thing” series wrap-up: How to rule them all?

What is it that remains for the 8th and last issue of the “Next Big Thing” blog post series: To “rule them all” (all the forces, disruptive challenges and game changing innovations) and keep services connected, operating, integrated, … to deliver value to the business.

A bit ago, I came upon Jonathan Murray’s concept of the Composable Enterprise – a paradigm which essentially preaches fully decoupled infrastructure and application as services for company IT. Whether the Composable Enterprise is an entire new approach or just a pin-pointed translation of what is essential to businesses mastering digital transformation challenges is all the same.

The importance lies with the core concepts of what Jonathan’s paradigm preaches. These are to

  • decouple the infrastructure
  • make data a service
  • decompose applications
  • and automate everything

Decouple the Infrastructure.

Rewind into my own application development and delivery times during the 1990ies and the 00-years: When we were ready to launch a new business application we would – as part of the rollout process – inform IT of resources (servers, databases, connections, interface configurations) needed to run the thing. Today, large IT ecosystems sometimes still function that way, making them a slow and heavy-weight inhibitor of business agility. The change to incorporate here is two-folded: On the one hand infra responsibles must understand that they need to deliver on scale, time, demand, … of their business customers (which includes more uniform, more agile and more flexible – in terms of sourcing – delivery mechanisms). And on the other hand, application architects need to understand that it is not anymore their architecture that defines IT needs but in turn their architecture needs to adapt to and adopt agile IT infrastructure resources from wherever they may be sourced. By following that pattern, CIOs will enable their IT landscapes to leverage not only more cloud-like infrastructure sourcing on-premise (thereby enabling private clouds) but also will they become capable of ubiquitously using ubiquitous resources following hybrid sourcing models.

Make Data a Service.

This isn’t about BigData-like services, really. It might be (in the long run). But this is essentially about where the properties and information of IT – of applications and services – really is located. Rewind again. This time only for like 1 or 2 years. The second last delivery framework, that me and my team of gorgeous cloud aficionados created, was still built around a central source of information – essentially a master data database. This simply was the logical framework architecture approach back then. Even only a few months – when admittedly me and my then team (another awesome one) already knew that information needs to lie within the service – it was still less complex (hence: quicker) to construct our framework around such a central source of (service) wisdom. What the Composable Enterprise, though, rightly preaches is a complete shift of where information resides. Every single service, which offers its capabilities to the IT world around it, needs to provide a well-defined, easy to consume, transparently reachable interface to query and store any information relevant to the consumption of the service. Applications or other services using that service simply engage via that interface – not only to leverage the service’s capabilities but even more to store and retrieve data and information relevant to the service and the interaction with it. And there is no central database. In essence there is no database at all. There is no need for any. When services inherently know what they manage, need and provide, all db-centric architecture for the sole benefit of the db as such becomes void.

Decompose Applications.

The aforementioned leads one way into the decomposition pattern. More important, however, is to spend more thorough thinking about what a single business related activity – a business process – really needs in terms of application support. And in turn, what the applications providing this support to the business precisely need to be capable of. Decomposing Applications means to identify useful service entities which follow the above patterns, offer certain functionality in an atom kind-of way via well-defined interfaces (APIs) to the outside world and thereby create an application landscape which delivers on scale, time, demand, … just by being composed through service orchestration in the right – the needed – way. This is the end of huge monolithic ERP systems, which claim to offer all that a business needs (you just needed to customize them rightly). This is the commencing of light-weight services which rapidly adopt to changing underlying infrastructures and can be consumed not only for the benefit of the business owning them but – through orchestration –form whole new business process support systems for cross-company integration along new digitalized business models.

Automate Everything.

So, eventually we’ve ended at the heart of how to breath life into an IT which supports businesses in their digital transformation challenge.

Let me talk you into one final example emphasizing the importance of facing all these disruptive challenges openly: An Austrian bank of high reputation (and respectful success in the market) gave a talk at the Pioneers about how they discovered that they are actually not a good bank anymore, how they discovered that – in some years’ time – they’d not be able to live up to the market challenges and customers’ demands anymore. What they discovered was simply, that within some years they would lose customers just because of their inability to offer a user experience integrated with the mobile and social demands of today’s generations. What they did in turn was to found a development hub within their IT unit, solely focussing on creating a new app-based ecosystem around their offerings in order to deliver an innovative, modern, digital experience to their bank account holders.

Some time prior to the Pioneers, I had received a text that “my” bank (yes, I am one of their customers) now offers a currency exchange app through which I can simply order the amount of currency needed and would receive a confirmation once it’s ready to be handed to me in the nearest branch office. And some days past the Pioneers I received an eMail that a new “virtual bank servant” would be ready as an app in the net to serve all my account-related needs. Needless to say that a few moments later I was in and that the experience was just perfect even though they follow an “early validation” policy with their new developments, accepting possible errors and flaws for the benefit of reduced time to market and more accurate customer feedback.

Now, for a moment imagine just a few of the important patterns behind this approach:

  • System maintenance and keeping-the-lights-on IT management
  • Flexible scaling of infrastructures
  • Core banking applications and services delivering the relevant information to the customer facing apps
  • App deployment on a regular – maybe a daily – basis
  • Integration of third-party service information
  • Data and information collection and aggregation for the benefit of enhanced customer behaviour insight
  • Provision of information to social platforms (to influence customer decisions)
  • Monitoring and dashboards (customer-facing as well as internally to business and IT leaders)
  • Risk mitigation
  • … (I could probably go on for hours)

All of the above capabilities can – and shall – be automated to a certain, a great extent. And this is precisely what the “automate everything” pattern is about.

Conclusion

There is a huge business shift going on. Software, back in the 80ies and 90ies was a driver for growth, had its downturn in and post the .com age and now enters an era of being ubiquitously demanded.

Through the innovative possibilities by combining existing mobile, social and data technologies, through the merge of physical and digital worlds and through the tremendously rapid invention of new thing-based daily-life support, businesses of all kind will face the need for software – even if they had not felt that need so far.

The Composable Enterprise – or whatever one wants to call a paradigm of loosely coupled services being orchestrated through well-defined transparently consumable interfaces – is a way for businesses to accommodate this challenge more rapidly. Automating daily routine – like e.g. the aforementioned tasks – will be key to enterprises which want to stay on the edge of innovation within these fast changing times.

Most importantly, though, is to stay focussed within the blurring worlds of things, humans and businesses. To keep the focus on innovation not for the benefit of innovation as such but for the benefit of growing the business behind.

Innovation Architects will be the business angels of tomorrow – navigating their stakeholders through an ongoing revolution and supporting or driving the right decisions for implementing and orchestrating services in a business-focussed way.

 

{the feature image of this last “The Next Big Thing” series post shows a design by New Jersey and New York-based architects and designers Patricia Sabater, Christopher Booth and Aditya Chauan: The Sky Cloud Skyscraper – found on evolo.us/architecture}

Published by:

The “Next Big Thing” series: Digital Transformation

Beware! No. 7 of the “Next Big Thing” blog post series is probably going to be at the heart of all the big business disruptions to come:

 

“Digital Business”

as a term has more or less become a substitute for the formerly heavily stressed “Industry 4.0”. Digital Business can best be described by a couple of examples illustrating how every business – without exception – will be disrupted by the huge innovative potential rolling along:

Example No. 1 – Retail and Education

School notifies the parents of a boy that he needs a certain educative material by tomorrow; they do that by means of a private message to the parents coming from the school’s facebook profile. The boy’s mother investigates through her mobile phone where the particular material can be purchased, connects to the store chain by means of a mobile app and requests availability information. The store responds with availability and price (through their app) also informs that the particular item has to be sent from a remote outlet and requests confirmation for the purchase and delivery. The mother responds with payment data and the school’s address for target delivery whereas the store chain triggers delivery of the item to the nearest train station, notifies the train operating company that a parcel needs to be delivered by tomorrow to the respective address whereas the train company in turn arranges for delivery to take place to the school’s nearest train station and from there by a drone directly to the school.

Example No. 2 – Weather and Insurance

A terrible thunderstorm destroys a house’s window. The respective sensors thoroughly detect the reason for the breakage of glass not to be from human intervention but from bad weather conditions and notifies the smart home automation gateway of what has happened. The gateway holds police, hospital and insurance contact information as well as necessary private customer IDs. Location address is derived via GPS positioning. The gateway self-triggers a notification and remediation workflow with the insurance company, which in turn assesses the incident to be a valid insurance case, triggers a repair order with an associated window glassworks company. The glassworks company fits the order into their schedule as it is treated an emergency under the given circumstances, rushes to the given location, repairs the windows, the workers report back to the insurance via mobile app and the insurance closes the case. All this happens without any human intervention other than final approval by the house’s owner that everything is OK again.

Example No. 3 – Holiday and Healthcare

The wearable body control device of an elderly lady records asynchronous heartbeat also slowly decelerating. The pattern is maintained within the device as being a situation of life endangering heart condition, hence the device commences transfer of detailed health monitoring data via the lady’s mobile phone to her children on the one hand and to her doctor in charge on the other hand. Both parties have (by means of device configuration) agreed to confirm the reception of data within 5 minutes after start of transmission. As none of this happens (because the kids are on holiday and the doctor is busy doing surgery) the device triggers notification of the nearest ambulance, transmits the patterns of normal health condition plus current condition and includes name, location, health insurance and nearest relatives data as well as the electronic apartment access key. The ambulance’s customer request system notifies the doctor in charge as well as the lady’s children that they’re taking over the case, an ambulance rushes to location, personal opens via mobile phone using the received electronic key, finds the lady breathing short and saves her life by commencing respective treatment immediately.

Fictious?

Well – maybe, today. But technology for all this is available and business models around it have begun to mature.

What these examples show – besides that they all encompass the integration of Things with several or all aspects of the Nexus of Forces discussed earlier in this article series – is an aspect essential to understanding “Digital Business” and that immense digitalization of our daily life: “Digital Business” is nothing else than the seamless (mean it;. literally: s-e-a-m-l-e-s-s) connection of humans, businesses and things (as in the IoT definition). “Digital Business” is a merger of physical and digital worlds!

In turn, this means plain simply, that there will be no business whatsoever that goes without software. Businesses already penetrated by software will experience increasing software, automation and integration challenges and businesses that haven’t yet introduced software into their models will face an increased challenge doing so, as well as to integrate with the digital world around them. Essentially for nothing else than just for staying in business.

 

{the 8th issue of this blog post series covers a way to approach all those challenges through creating a true services ecosystem for the enterprise; and as it’s the last it also wraps up and concludes}

{feature image found on http://marketingland.com/}

 

Published by:

The “Next Big Thing” series: Discussing The Thing

Opening chapter No. 6 of the “Next Big Thing” blog post series by discussing the Internet of Things!

What’s essentially so entirely new about the Internet of Things? Things are not. Connectivity and protocols might be – but not entirely. Mastering the data produced by things – well: we’ve discussed that bit in one of the earlier posts of this series.

What’s really entirely new is the speed of adoption that the topic now reaches; and this speed is based on the possibilities that technology innovation have begun to offer to new things-based ecosystems.

In order to understand that, one has to judge the elements of a things-based architecture. While the article “Understanding the IoT Landscape” offers a quite comprehensive simplified IoT architecture, I would tend to be a little more detailed in assessing the elements of a functioning IoT ecosystem:

Architecture building blocks in an IoT Ecosystem

Figure: Architecture building blocks in an IoT Ecosystem

  1. The Thing itself. The variety of what a “Thing” may be is vast: medical human wearable monitoring devices (e.g. heart monitor), medical measurement devices (such as a diabetes meter), sensors, transmitters and alert devices in automated cars, smart home automation sensors, fitness wearables or simply watches that take over several of the above capabilities at once, … and many more things that aren’t even invented or thought of yet (the aforementioned article gives a decent list of what Things could possibly be). Discussing implementation architectures for the Thing itself would exceed the scope of this article by far, obviously.
  2. The Thing’s UI: This is already an interestingly ambiguous architecture element. Do Things have UIs? Yes, they do. Sometimes only comprised of one or a few LEDs or the-like of it. They could, of course, also have none at all if in case interfacing with a Thing’s user is delegated to either a mobile phone or a gateway which the Thing is connected to.
  3. Thing Connectivity and Communication Layer: The purpose of which is solely to bridge the gap between the Thing itself and the first connectivity point capable of transferring data through well-established protocols. Thing Connectivity may sometimes be reached through WiFi but often also by just using Bluetooth or any other wireless near field communication protocols.
  4. Thing Gateway: Rarely will Things directly feed data into any backend analytics or application layer; simply because it is too costly and complicated to accomplishing high performant, secure and reliable data connection based on proprietary protocols over long connectivity routes. Hence, we’ll often see some kind of gateway being introduced with the Thing which in simple cases could just be a mobile phone.
  5. Data Store: By whatever way Things might be leveraged by the business’s backend IT, we will always see a data collection and storage layer introduced to directly capture and provide Thing data for further compute, analysis and application integration.
  6. Application Integration: One essential topic to consider when introducing Things into business models is to envision an application landscape around the Thing in order to offer app-based Thing interaction to the end consumer as well as information from Things and their usage to the Thing’s business plus to third-party consumers in order to drive cross-business integration. New cross-enterprise business models will evolve anyway – the better Things-centered businesses allow for integration and orchestration, the better they will be able to leverage and let others leverage their disruptive innovations.
  7. Analytics: No Thing-based business – no Things introduction – will make any sense without creating the ability to leverage the information produced for analysis and even more for prediction or even prescription. We will see more of that in the next section of the article.

The impact to IT when discussing the change through IoT cannot be overestimated. Just by assessing the layers described above it does become obvious that we will see quite a lot of new architectural approaches evolve which in turn need to be integrated with existing IT landscapes. Also – as with all the more recent disruptions in enterprise IT – the orchestration of different services maturing in the “Things” space will be key for IT organizations to offer utmost business value when leveraging the Internet of Things.

 

{No. 7 of this blog post series will cover “Digitalization” and “Digital Transformation” – and what it really means to any business}

{feature image borrowed from the IoT wikipedia article}

 

Published by:

The “Next Big Thing” series: What’s Industry 4.0 anyway?

So, here’s to continue with “The Next Big Thing” blog post series. Let’s take a leap into what really matters in the coming years – to all kinds of businesses:

Once upon a time

there was The Web. Then Web 2.0. Web 3.0 (Semantics and Augmentation). Then the saying of the “3rd Industrial Revolution”.

I recall, that in the beginnings of the term being used people explained this to be the raise of Cloud Computing and the ubiquitous social and mobile interconnection, whereas later many have corrected themselves to see it as the Industrial Revolution that was started with the raise of the personal computer.

Nowadays, no one seems to be really talking of any Industrial Revolution anymore (might be that they’re unsure whether it’s the 3rd, the 4th or whether we’re in the midst of a constant revolution anyway), but businesses needed a term to describe their striving for technologies that constantly get smarter and help them grow.

Industry 4.0 was born. And it seemed for some time that the core concepts of Industry 4.0 are robotics and the “Internet of Things” (IoT). Whereas the first is still true, “Industry 4.0” has become a term used mainly in the field of manufacturing: Smart factories supported by intense introduction of robotics-based technologies and machines as well as heavy adoption of Automation form the cornerstones of the Industry 4.0 age.

And while there are expert sources that extend the coverage of the Industry 4.0 term also into a world outside of factories (with smart machines like e.g. drones, driverless cars and human support roboters – see e.g. my German-only blog post “Innovationskraft ist nicht das Problem” or the keynote discussed there), the most confusing definition of Industry 4.0 occurred to me in both the English and the German version of Wikipedia, where the article defining the term (at the moment of writing this post) starts by saying: “Industry 4.0 is a project in the high-tech strategy of the German government”.

Hence, I trust that for the benefit of a clear and focussed discussion within this little blog series, it is of advantage to omit the term “Industry 4.0” for a moment and talk about what really will disrupt business and IT in the next couple of years.

And these are mainly

3 Aspects

of an extensively integrated and orchestrated world:

  • Things
  • Digitalized business
  • and a great amount of lightweight well-orchestrated and automated services

The upcoming issues of this series will cover these aspects in more detail – stay tuned.

 

{We’ll start into the “Things” stuff with No. 6 of this blog post series}

{feature image found on www.automationworld.com}

Published by:

The “Next Big Thing” series: #Mobile Everywhere

{this is No. 4 of the “Next Big Thing” blog post series, which discusses the revolution to come through ongoing innovation in IT and the challenges involved with’em}

 

I would be interested in getting to know, how many readers of this series still know a person not owning a smartphone? (I do, by the way ;))

Even though I have written several times about the danger of it and how important it is to consider behaviour for a healthy adoption of “Mobile Everywhere” (e.g. in “Switch Offor “3 importances for a self-aware social networker) I am still a strong believer in the advantages that elaborate mobile technology brings into day-2-day life.

Not only do mobile phone technology and mobile app ecosystems add significant value to the other two forces (data and social) but additionally they’ve meanwhile “learned” to make vast use of them. You could actually describe a stacked model of this bond of disruptive technologies which are discussed in this series in a way that

  • data is the back-end business layer of the future
  • social platforms are the middleware to bring together information offers and information needs
  • and mobile technology is the front end to support information and data consumption in both ways

The image below turns the “Nexus”-model from the beginning of this series into a stack appearance:

 

Nexus of Forces (stacked)

Nexus of Forces (stacked)

 

Which – essentially – closes the loop with why we do see a bond of not only the technologies in mobility, social media and data and analytics but even more the visions, strategies and concepts of these three. Needless to say, therefore, that businesses who have a strong strategy and vision around the Nexus of Forces and – at the same time – are backed by a strong Service Orchestration roadmap will be the winners of the “race of embrace” of this bond.

Now, thinking of the Pioneers, which I’ve started this blog series with, I recall that one could see all forms of leveraging the aforementioned concepts in the ideas of the startups presenting there. And – unsurprisingly to me – not a single moment during those 2 festival days back in October this year, “Cloud” was even mentioned, let alone discussed. It is no topic anymore. Period.

However, there’s more: The Nexus of Forces as such is only the beginning of a path leading into the next industrial revolution and we’re already well under way. Hence, this blog series will continue discussing concepts and challenges which build upon the Nexus of Forces and takes it to the next level with change to come for each and every enterprise – software-based, hardware-based or not even technology-based at all.

 

{No. 5 of this blog post series takes the first step into “Industry 4.0” and related disruptive topics}

Published by:

The “Next Big Thing” series: From Social Network to #Social #Revolution

{this is No. 3 of the “Next Big Thing” blog post series, which discusses the revolution to come through ongoing innovation in IT and the challenges involved with’em}

 

Along with Cloud patterns the delivery of large engagement platforms – essentially web applications architectured, of course, specifically to serve a vast amount of simultaneous access and a huge stream of information – became possible.

If one does take a look back into history of social media, these platforms step-by-step evolved from pure public-chat and tweet apps into full blown areas for (group) communications, gaming, advertising and (sometimes) simply storing information. Not by what they were originally intended to be (facebook’s core goal was – and still is, if you trust Zuckerberg – to connect everyone) but by how the consumers (private or business ones) developed themselves within them as well as developed and matured their usage patterns.

However, there is a “meta level” beyond the obvious: Observing youth and their approach to using technology surrounding them might lead to thinking: Those guys have completely forgotten about communication and engagement. I trust, the opposite is the case. When I talk to my kids, I learn that they read everything, absorb everything, have a much faster ability to notice news, information, consume different channels, etc. The only thing is: They do not react, if it doesn’t touch them. And that pattern applies not only to advertisement-backed social media feeds but also – and maybe foremost – to direct 1:1 or group conversations. And this is why I believe that the social aspect within the Nexus of Forces will have a much stronger impact than we currently notice.

I tend to claim a social revolution to approach us because – together with the other forces – social media will become the integrative middleware between what we want to consume, businesses want to drive us to consume and how we consume it. No advertising phone calls anymore, no spamming in our mailboxes (hurray!), but a social feed of information which is far better suited to create the impression of personal engagement while in truth being just an efficient aggregation and combination of data that we all have earlier produced ourselves.

Are businesses ready for that revolution? Can they adapt their marketing strategies to leverage those vast new possibilities? Orchestrating services and data in order to feed social platforms with what is considered relevant to the customers of a certain enterprise will become a core IT capability in order to be able to become a player of relevance in the social revolution.

 

{No. 4 of this blog post series talks about the challenges of the “mobile everywhere” culture – soon to come – stay tuned}

feature image found at AFAO talks (http://afaotalks.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/going-social_20.html)

Published by:

The “Next Big Thing” series: #BigData

{this is No. 2 of the “Next Big Thing” blog post series, which discusses the revolution to come through ongoing innovation in IT and the challenges involved with’em}

 

When working to compose a definition of what BigData really is, I discovered a good blogpost by CloudVane from earlier this year. CloudVane nicely outlines why BigData as such is essentially a concept – not a technology or a pattern or an architecture. The term BigData summarizes the

  • legal
  • social
  • technology
  • application and
  • business

dimension of the fact that through applications being consumed from the internet, through us being constantly connected, through us sharing loads of content with our social worlds, … a vast amount of information is generated and needs to be managed and efficiently used.

To begin with, the main challenge of the BigData concept was not technology but businesses’ complete lack of vision what to do with all the information gathered. Technology stacks and architecture weren’t a problem for long – though they have matured over time either, of course. However, the biggest concern of businesses was (and sometimes still is) how to use that vast amount of data they suddenly became the master of. Hence, a solid BigData strategy of a certain business does not only need to have a clear understanding of how to collect and master data technically but rather to create a vision of what to derive from it and how to add business value through it.

Clearly, technology does have a role in it. And IT leaders must back business strategists by striving for mastery of the evolving BigData ecosystems within their IT landscape. Besides becoming specialists of newly introduced BigData and Analytics technology (Hadoop, Hive, Pig, Spark, …), this specifically means to have an orchestration story ready, that enables an enterprise’s legacy IT to integrate with all those new services introduced through new data strategies. Automation and orchestration architecture therefore will become a core role within the IT organization in order to support businesses in their striving for data insight and value.

 

{No. 3 of this blog post series is about a social revolution to come}

Published by:

The Next Big Thing (the even looonger End of the Cloud)

With the Pioneers still in the back of my mind, with all the startups’ ideas presented there, with predictions of like 40 billion connected “things” by 2020 (Source: Gartner) and all those many buzzwords around in these areas I am even more convinced that “The Cloud” as a discussable topic – as a matter that needs any kind of consideration whatsoever – is really at its end.

In case you read the writeup of one of my keynotes, you may recall the red line through it which stated a mere end to the early concepts of Cloud Computing as those concepts have so much matured and so deeply entered businesses and the internet as such, that we can securely claim Cloud to be ubiquitous: It is just there. Just as the Internet has been for years now.

So, what’s next? BigData? Social Revolution? Mobile Everywhere? All of that and any combination?

Here comes a series of posts discussing these topics and beyond. It will offer some clarifying definitions and delineations.

The first parts will cover what’s to expect by the bond of data and analytics, mobility and social media. In the second half it will discuss the huge transformation challenges involved with the digitalization of business. The conclusive part is about how IT has to change in order to support businesses rightly in these challenging and ever-changing times.

 

So let’s begin with

The Nexus of Forces

Nexus of Forces

The Nexus of Forces from another perspective

 

I like this paradigm that was originally postulated by Gartner some time ago (I read it first in the “Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies 2014”). It describes the bonding of Cloud Computing with BigData, Social and Mobile.

Personally – unsurprisingly – I would disagree with Gartner to see “Cloud” as one of the 4 forces; rather my claim would be that Cloud Computing is the underlying basis to everything else. Why? Because any of those ecosystems which are to support the other 3 forces (mobile, social, data) builds inherently along the 5 essential characteristics of Cloud which still define whether a particular service is within or out of the definition:

  • On demand self-service: make things available when they’re needed
  • Broad network access: ensure delivery of the service through ubiquitous networking on high bandwidth
  • Resource pooling: Manage resources consumed by the service efficiently for sharing between service tenants
  • Rapid elasticity: Enable the service to scale up and down based on the demand of consumers
  • Measured: Offer utmost transparency about what service consumers have been using over time match it clearly and transparently with what they’re charged.

Hence, when now continuing to discuss the Nexus of Forces, I will keep it with the three of them and will not query The Cloud’s role in it (sic! “It’s the End of the Cloud as we know it” ;))

 

{No. 2 of this series discusses definition and challenges related to data and analytics}

 

Update: feature image added (found at http://forcelinkpr.net/?p=9612)

Published by:

I wasn’t cheating (It’s still the End of the Cloud)

I swear, i haven’t known any of what I’m going to share with you in this post, when I wrote “The End of the Cloud (as we know it)“. If I would have I probably may not have written it.

Anyway, this is about Jonathan Murray, CTO of Warner Music Group (@Adamalthus), defining something that isn’t even mentioned yet by Gartner and the-like (google it, for proof; even bing it; the result remains the same). And – hey! – he did that back in April 2013.

What he’s essentially saying is, that in order to enable businesses to compete in an ever more demanding, more dynamic, more agile era of interacting services and capabilities, in an era where things are connected to the net, to systems, to businesses, to humans, in an era where everything is going to be digitalized, IT needs to disruptively change not only the way it is delivered to businesses but actually the way it is built.

What Jonathan demands for (and according to his own account is realizing within Warner) is “IT Factories”. No Silos anymore. No monolithic application engineering and delivery. A service oriented component architecture for everything IT needs to deliver and connect with. And the term “Cloud” isn’t even mentioned. Because we’ve landed beyond even discussing it. The models are clear. The need for adopting them for the benefit of a new – an agile – IT is now!

What Jonathan demands for is “The Composable Enterprise” – essentially consisting of 4 core patterns:

  • Decouple the Infrastructure
  • Make Data a Service (awesome, disruptive quote from Jonathan’s September 2013 “CloudFoundry Conference” talk: “Stored procedures need to be strangled at birth!”)
  • Decompose Applications
  • and finally, of course: Automate Everything

Read the concept in his blog post on adamalthus.com.

And here’s two recordings of talks given by Jonathan – both really worth watching:

And then, let’s go build it …!

 

Published by:

(It’s) The End of the Cloud (as we know it)

“It’s the end of the world as we know it”, they say, “and I feel fine”. I do indeed. Things change. And change is always moving us and all around us. And in the best case it’s moving us forward.

So, let me start with a very moving (and maybe touching) statement:

 

“The Cloud has ended!
You can now stop talking about it.”

After about 5 years (if you think of the Middle-of-Europe geography – maybe some more in the US), the Cloud has finally come to its end. That’s great! Because eventually we can luckily move on to the really important things in our day-2-day IT life!

So – why is that? Why do I have the strong believe, that this hype is now finally over?

Some 5 years ago I participated in a panel discussion. And the main area it circulated on was whether Cloud can ever be secure or not – multi tenant or not – reliable or not – compliant or not. The panel discussion as such went quite well and eventually attendees of some real industry giants, like e.g. Siemens, for the first time felt assured that this was

 

The next Big Thing to Come …

And it was! Indeed! It remained to be perceived as the next big thing for the next – well – let’s say: 2 to 3 years.

That occasion back then was only one example – however – of how conversations went going forward. People lost themselves in arguments of security, compliance, controlability and segregatability of a cloudy, foggy and fuzzy monster which none could really grasp for a long time. Discussing these was just more easy than to understand the big advantages to come …

Still, it remained not only a hype but took its turn into our everyday life! Even more than that – Cloud Computing became the basis for what we today call the third IT revolution. And many talks today aim at spanning everybody’s perception regarding this revolution – one within our everyday lifes with IT being planted into any kind of small or big device – one within our industry lifes with production processes being shifted by 90° to create a complete new way of delivering applications – and eventually also a revolution for the big players as many of them might lose traction when remaining one foot on the platform, the other on the train for too long …

Soon after that panel discussion back in 2009, me and my then team entered the Windows Azure “Technology Adoption Program”. We created a first Cloud-based software distribution platform; you could compare it to those Systems Management architectures which have been very common for long in enterprise IT. By using Cloud patterns, we were able to address a broader reach and distribute more scalable and more flexible. Azure – back then – had its really major leaks and intensively improved down the path – together with fellow teams like ours who recommended changes and enhancements to the platform without end. Amazon – by that time – had already its place in the market. But what were they doing? Nothing more and nothing less than providing servers – more or less. Infrastructure-as-a-Service, it was called (question is: would you claim this to be disruptive today?).

Everybody talked about

 

The Big 3

Amazon, Microsoft and of course — ? — Google. Question: What’s one common thing of all 3 of them??

Exactly: All are US-based, spreading their capabilities over the world pretty quickly – backed by major investments – but still US-based. And every enterprise also back then knew: This was not going to work in compliancy to their respective country’s law or their anti trust regulatory.

So what remained the major discussion over years? Still? Security. Compliance. Controlability. Segregatability – still the same. Resentiments were omnipresent and the Big 3 kept having a hard time generating adoption of their brilliant new technologies (whereas admittedly Microsoft had the hardest time, because they leaked a $-rollin ecosystem such as brilliant search or brilliant book-sells).

Still, that Cloud-hype was not killable. Despite all concerns of private and public endavours, of small businesses and large enterprises, Cloud Computing remained and even strengthened its position as the basis for more to come: Technology ecosystems that evolved solely and purely because cloud took its turn into our everyday life and everyday enterprise IT.

And how couldn’t it?

How many of us are using eMail, some kind of file sharing facility, a social network of any kind? Anyone not using any remotely hosted collaboration product, authoring tools, design helpers – like the Adobe family – etc. etc. …

Who’s been using that within one’s work environment daily? For how long? 2 years, 3 years, …

We have all long ago started to enhance our day-2-day work experience by adding usefull little helpers into our IT-wise behaviour – sometimes without even noticing, into how far away premises we’re providing our data to. Haven’t we?

And many times we’ve all done that long before our enterprise IT provider offered us the same convenience, the same workforce enhancements from within our company’s premises. Either privately or even on our company PCs. Enterprise IT departments have been facing the worst time of their existence with sleepless nights for CIOs asking themselves the very same question ever and ever again: How the hell can I stop that Cloud thingy to happen to my enetrprise IT when it is so unsecure and uncompliant and at the same time, all my CxO’s are using it on their iPads? How can I adopt it without losing control completely.

Well – Ladies and Gentlemen – let me assure you: The nightmare has an end as it’s

 

The End of the Cloud as we know it!

(BTW: Ever had a look to a recent Gartner hypecycle and its positioning of “Cloud Computing”: They kept having it on the declinign edge for the last 2 years or so …) So I think we can rest assured: Our struggle is over.

But why? Why can a hype that big, that it managed to become the basis for all new and disruptive power in IT – social, mobile apps, data management and analytics – finally end?

Because it finally became utterly boring! Because it simply isn’t Cloud anymore, we’re talking about! Stop talking Cloud. Stop talking SaaS. It’s not retaining the importance it used to have. It has ceased to exist as a self-contained technology arguing its relevance by itself. It has ceased to exist on its own.

Hence – and here comes another good news – we’re now finally able to adopt this great new technology precisely for what we really neeed it: To accelerate and grow the businesses, which we – the IT guys amongst us – are bound to support. To integrate it into the devices we’re creating and stay as connected as needed. Or to accelerate our delivery into continuity. Or to simply consume the Services, we need to consume. Right now. Right as much and rapid as we need’em. And ultimately: To bridge the great IT systems we’ve all been managing for decades with the elasticity and scalability and accuracy of what was formerly called Cloud.

Let me talk you through a few examples:

  • Salesforce started in 2001. Claiming the decline of Software. They were facing the same concerns, the same weak adoption (at least in the beginning), the same hurdles for their entirely subscription based model. Today, Salesforce offers an ecosystem of products – even a platform to create your own: force.com – which are virtually friction-freely integrateable with your on-prem IT; mostly by just a few configurational mouseclicks. And a huge many enterprises trust Salesforce just enough to provide them one of their most critical business assets: their customer and opportunity data.
  • Or take user management: Many of today’s enterprises still struggle with providing their businesses a seamless login and authorization experience. At the same time, many roll out an identity provider which bridges on-prem IT systems with SaaS-provided systems and thereby offer a totally new single-sign-on experience not only within their on-prem IT. It’s a way of shifting – or even vanishing – the borders.
  • Or think of the most obvious of all examples: Infrastructure and Application Provisioning. Who has not yet introduced Virtualization in its IT? Every larger enterprise has, and the smaller ones leverage it from some out-of-prem providers. Finally, the technology that was formerly called “Cloud” has evolved into a level of maturity that it lives up to the promises of some earlier days: There’s means for you to control and manage your on-premise IT infrastructure seamlessly in a joint way with some Infrastructure provided – well – somewhere (I’m not stressing the word again).

However,

 

One Piece is Missing

One extensively important technology item that has the ability and purpose of glueing it all together: Automation. Or to be precise: Automation and Orchestration.

We are entering the era of Orchestration. We’re leaving the self-fullfilling technology-focussed island of pure “Cloud” behind us and can finally commence to create the really interesting stuff: By bridging our solidly designed and implemented IT systems and architectures with some even more solid, secure and reliable, scalable, elastic architectures, we are accelerating the business value of technology. We start to shift our thinking towards “Orchestration” and “Service”:

So, trust me: It’s the End of the Cloud as we know it! And we indeed can feel entirely fine about it. Security concerns have been addressed all the past years. Compliancy has been factored into vendor’s platforms – as has multi tenancy. And we are able to control where our data resides. Hence, the change can finally move on. We can stop talking “Cloud” as it became so boring as a standalone technology.

 

The Hype is Over

We’re entering the era of Orchestration – of Service Orchestration and entirely Service-based delivery. And Automation is the glue to make it happen. Automation is the glue between those valuable, well-defined, secure IT architectures and whole-new ecosystems of platforms – for the benefit of Service Orchestration.

So: Let us stop the “Cloud” talk. And start to

Automate to Orchestrate

 

 

Published by:
%d bloggers like this: